Skagit County Water Source

RainBank Rainwater Systems has broken through the barriers that have restricted rainwater collection as an approved water source for single family residences in Skagit County.

With the instream flow rules,  many property owners in the Skagit River Basin were unable to develop their properties. WA State Department of Ecology encouraged Skagit County to adopt the practice as a solution that would benefit the river and salmon habitat, while providing a viable water source. Limited permitting for the affected areas was considered as recently as 2015.

A group of residents from Guemas Island petitioned the county to accept rainwater for potable use for homes that were experiencing salt water intrusion in their wells. RainBank Rainwater Systems, along Tim Pope, ARCSA educator and past president, met with Skagit County in January 2017 to encourage acceptance of potable rainwater collection as a viable alternative source, not only in the instream flow rules affected areas but to those who are experiencing other hardships regarding potable water.

RainBank Rainwater Systems is pleased with the recent design approvals from Skagit County for potable residential RWC systems outside the instream flow rules, allowing for more property owners in Skagit County. We look forward to assisting Skagit County residents with their dreams of developing or purchasing properties with limited water resources.

Rainwater for Vehicle Washdown

A five-year old rainwater harvesting system built for the city of Guelph, Ontario, Canada  received an award for saving enough drinking water to fill four Olympic-sized swimming pools – by using captured rain for vehicle washdown.

The Water’s Next national awards program honors the achievements and ideas of individuals and companies that successfully work to change water in Canada.

Award categories include:

Business Leader: Person in the private sector that has demonstrated significant leadership and innovation in the water sector.

Academic Leader: Person in the academic sector that has demonstrated significant leadership, innovation, and scientific excellence in the water sector.

Non-Government Leader: Person in the non-government sector that has demonstrated significant leadership, innovation, and influence in the water sector.

Government (includes municipalities, agencies, watershed authorities, and First Nations government) Person in the public sector that has demonstrated significant leadership, innovation, and influence in the public sector, towards the benefit of Canada’s water resources.

Young Professionals: Individual under the age of 30 working in the water sector who has demonstrated exemplary leadership, innovation, and growth potential.

An additional benefit of using rainwater to clean city buses is that the captured rainwater is softer than groundwater, therefore, less cleaning products are needed, which saves money for the city.

“We rely on a groundwater supply in Guelph, and we need to be smart about how we use water—at home, at work and at our City facilities,” said Emily Stahl, manager of technical services for the City’s Water Services department. “It makes sense to match the water supply provided with the use, and naturally soft rainwater is better for washing buses, and cars at home too.”

Click here to read more about Guelph’s water advocacy award.

RainBank designs and installs systems for potable and non-potable usage, including vehicle washdown, laundry and toilet facilities.

Contact us today to discuss a system for your home or business.

Rainwater Systems