Category Archives: Sustainability

Net-Zero Home Wins With RainBank Design

Photo credit: greenbuildermedia.com

If you think you can’t afford to build a sustainable, net-zero home in greater Seattle, we encourage you to read on.

“I still talk to people who don’t even know it’s possible to build a net-zero home for the same price as a conventional home,” says Ted Clifton, designer, builder and owner at TC Legend. Clifton is quoted in an article, posted by Juliet Grable in Green Builder Media, announcing that his company constructed the home that is a recipient of the 10th Annual Green Home of the Year Award.

RainBank is excited to be part of this project, which used RainBank’s rainwater collection system design consisting of four 2,500-gallon cisterns located below the first-floor deck, for a total storage capacity of 10,000 gallons. The system supplies all of the water used in the three-story home, including irrigation.

According to the TC Legend website, “When a net-zero-energy home can be built at a cost on par with traditional construction, everyone wins. TC Legend Homes is helping to usher in a new era of green construction in which homeowners don’t have to choose between cutting-edge efficiency and staying on budget. Our customers expect to save money owning their home, not spend more.”

RainBank Rainwater Systems is the leading, go-to company for green building architects and construction firms that seek modern rainwater collection systems, designs and builds.

An Earth Day Reminder

Earth Day is a celebration of our planet and a reminder to practice sustainability every day.

Earth Day, for me, is a time for reflection of accomplishments and future goals in our stewardship of our planet.

Suggested Goals:

To stimulate progressive action in conservation of our natural habitat.

To encourage others to adopt sustainable practices of our limited resources.

To pledge involvement and commitment of ourselves in improving awareness and policy.

To teach others the benefits, socially and economically of sustainability.

To work with all to protect our earth.

 

After all it is up to us as inhabitants.

As World Demand for Water Mounts – How Much is it Really Worth?

Since we’re still searching for answers, and the world need for water continues to mount, here is a repost of our article originally titled How Much is Water (Conservation) Worth?

The question in itself is a huge discussion among corporate leaders and governmental agencies throughout the world. With increased demands of growing populations, droughts which plague many regions globally, and the lack of conservation, many are asking “how do we protect a common resource throughout the world, while providing a necessity of life for all of its inhabitants?” According to the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change “We have a genuine, burgeoning, boundary – crossing crisis over water.” PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi says “The world water crisis is one of the most pressing challenges of our age.”

Companies are concerned as farmland suffers and the demand for water mounts. What is the solution? According to Fortune Magazine, “Some say: make people pay more for the most precious commodity on earth. “When water has no value, even low-cost technology will never get implemented on a large scale.”  Furthermore, the article deems that water is so inexpensive that there is no incentive for conservation. Water needed for drinking, cooking, farming and basic life supporting necessities needs to be available to all, while there should be limits on non-essential use of water with cost increases to offset conservation practices and technologies.

The city of San Diego, which has experienced a drought not seen before in our lifetime, is investing money in large scale desalinization systems, paid for, in part, by a tiered water pricing system. While many think this to be controversial, the need is there, without some sort of rethinking how we manage our water supplies, there will be little water to manage.

While rainwater collection is not going to be the final answer to water conservation, it certainly is a simple step that can be adopted relatively inexpensively, and with positive results on a small scale. Think about the money that can be saved by our municipal water districts which can then be redirected to other methods of supplying water. If the city of San Diego, as well as other cities would realize the value of water and encourage rainwater collection on a larger scale, we could conserve over half the amount of water being wasted for non-essential use.

What steps have you taken to conserve water?  Leave a comment.