Tag Archives: runoff

Labor Day: A Working Man’s Holiday

Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of the American worker.  It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.

RainBank Rainwater Systems’ Chad Lindsly is seen in the photo at left, at the 2017 Stormwater Conference in Seattle, where he is explaining the benefits of collecting rainwater for beneficial usage, while mitigating stormwater.

RainBank Rainwater Systems would like to take a moment to recognize the combined dedication of our employees, along with members of the American Rainwater Catchment Systems Association (ARCSA), in the advancement of stormwater management and rainwater collection. The efforts of these dedicated individuals in bringing education and awareness of the effects of stormwater runoff and the benefits of collection before it becomes runoff should not go unnoticed.

How Do EPA Budget Cuts Affect Drinking Water Supplies?

How will the 31% budget cuts to the EPA affect our country’s drinking water?

An order of review of the “Clean Water Rule” will likely cut protections for smaller streams and wetlands.

According to Scientific American, “Wetlands do an excellent job of filtering out pollutants.  As an example, bacteria in wetlands remove nutrients like nitrates from agricultural fertilizer run off, which prevents the contamination from living down stream.” Thus, affecting larger bodies of water, which are reservoirs for much of our water supplies .

Cuts to the National Forest Service can put our watersheds at risk. Forested areas are crucial to infiltration of ground water. Much of our nation’s water supply is from well water, dependent on natural filtering. Runoff caused by development and deforestation would directly affect water quality from increased pollutants entering larger bodies of water.

The Clean Water Act protects major water bodies like large streams, rivers, bays and other coastal waters, along with streams and wetlands that flow into them from being destroyed or polluted—or, at least, not polluted without federal oversight. It covers a large range of pollutants, including sewage, garbage, biological and radioactive materials, and industrial and agricultural waste.

States need the EPA as backup to costs of programs that study, monitor, and write policies that protect our nation’s water supplies. The Federal government, with the clean water act of the 1970s and its amendments, need to remain in tact for the health and welfare of our nation.

What Could You Do With Rainwater Coming Off Your Roof?

What Could You Do With Rainwater Coming Off Your Roof?

You could use it for toilet flushing or irrigation as many commercial buildings are doing.
OR you could use it to make wine!

The University of California Davis (UC Davis) and wine production industry solutions provider Winesecrets partnered with GE to pilot an innovative program to use captured rainwater in wine production. By reusing rainwater, rather than pulling freshwater from the aquifer for wine production, the pilot program offers a unique way to supply the needed wash water for the wine production process.

Read more…

Image courtesy of Watertechonline