Rainwater Collection is a Simple Source for Decentralized Water

decentralized waterRainwater collection, a simple source for decentralized water, can be the answer to our aging, centralized water systems. With expected increased demand from high density development and the high cost of upgrading infrastructure to meet those demands, water will become the new commodity. Much has been discussed about privatization of water districts in order to fund these expenses, turning these districts into “for profit” businesses.  Large corporations such as Nestlé are actively pursuing this new business model.

What effect will privatization and profit generating water companies have on water supplies? Will Wall Street play a part in the trading, much like oil or any other commodity? What then will happen to the average consumer? What level will supply and demand hold on the price and pricing of water?

Rainwater collection and use can play an important role in not only supply, but potentially help keep costs down for the consumer and water districts. Simple water conservation, along with  collection can decrease supply and demand by supplementing centralized water. A rainwater collection system used only for toilet flushing and laundry facilities can save the average home 50% of its use. Commercial buildings can supply their irrigation and toilet flushing needs with rainwater collection while saving thousands of cubic yards of centralized water consumption.

The supply and demand of centralized water can be mitigated with rainwater collection on a large scale by small supplementary rainwater collection systems for commercial and residential use.

Ken Blair
A rainwater collection systems designer and consultant, Ken has designed and installed residential and commercial systems, primarily in the northwest United States for more than 10 years and, in 2014, began consulting and managing builds in other states. Ken is an accredited ARCSA Professional Designer / Installer and Life Member, the Northwest Regional ARCSA representative and advisor to its education committee and is available to speak about Rainwater Collection Systems design and builds.

Ken is a United States Navy veteran, having served on active duty during the Vietnam War era. He attained the rate of E-4 Machinist Mate.

A career entrepreneur, Ken created a new business focus with a commercial dive company in Hawaii in the mid 1980′s to respond to and clean up oil spills, oil spill equipment training, service and maintenance for the oil co-op service industry. Ken is passionate about having a positive impact on the environment and is also a founding director of BANK-ON-RAIN (2011-2014), whose mission is to create grassroots solutions for rainwater collection for consumption and agriculture in developing areas of the planet.

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